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energy efficiency of fuel for cooling

This is a measure of how efficiently a specific fuel can be converted to use for cooling, expressed as a proportion of a unit of the fuel.

Used to calculate:fossil fuels consumed and biomass fuels consumed

Varies by: fuel

Used fuel Reference Location: Ecosystem
(study period)
Value Units Notes
* Biodiesel U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Coal U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Diesel / light fuel oil U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Electricity Navigant Consulting, Inc. 2007 - EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case Second Edition (Revised) US: Buildings () 11.2 % (0 - 100) This value is the typical EER (energy efficiency ratio) for commercial rooftop units' air conditioning in 2010.
Electricity Navigant Consulting, Inc. 2007 - EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case Second Edition (Revised) US: Buildings () 10.2 % (0 - 100) This value is the typical EER (energy efficiency ratio) for residential room air conditioning in 2010.
Electricity Navigant Consulting, Inc. 2007 - EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case Second Edition (Revised) US: Buildings () 13 % (0 - 100) This value is the typical SEER (seasonal energy efficiency ratio) for residential central air conditioning in 2010.
* Ethanol U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Gas-electric hybrid U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Gasoline U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Geothermal EIA 2010 - Geothermal Heat Pump Manufacturing Activities 2009 US: All () 16.875 % (0 - 100) This is the average EER (Energy Efficiency Ratio) of the cooling efficiencies of the four different 2009 model types listed.
* Hydroelectric U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Hydrogen U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Jet fuel U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Kerosene U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Municipal solid waste U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Muscle U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Natural gas Navigant Consulting, Inc. 2007 - EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case Second Edition (Revised) US: Buildings () 0.7 proportion (0-1) This value is the typical COP (coefficient of performance) for commercial natural gas-fired engine driven rooftop air conditioning in 2010.
* Natural gas compressed (CNG) U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Natural gas liquefied (LNG) U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Nuclear material U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Propane / LPG U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Residual fuel oil U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Solar U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Steam Spanswick 2003 Advances in Steam Cooling USA: Steam water cooler (two-stage absorption) (2003) 1.3 proportion (0-1) Spanswick (2003) lists the Integrated Part-Load Value (IPLV) for a steam, two stage absorption water cooler as 1.3 on a coefficient of performance (COP) basis. The COP is the ratio of heat removed by air conditioning to the energy applied to the air conditioner. IPLV adjusts the value for a hypothetical season according to Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute Standards 560-2000 and 550/590-1998. In other words, 1.3x more heat is removed than energy applied in steam, equivalent to an efficiency of 130%.
Steam Spanswick 2003 Advances in Steam Cooling USA: Steam / Hot Water water cooler (single stage absorption) (2003) 0.8 proportion (0-1) Spanswick (2003) lists the Integrated Part-Load Value (IPLV) for a steam single stage absorption water cooler as 0.8 on a coefficient of performance (COP) basis. The COP is the ratio of heat removed by air conditioning to the energy applied to the air conditioner. IPLV adjusts the value for a hypothetical season according to Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute Standards 560-2000 and 550/590-1998.
Steam Spanswick 2003 Advances in Steam Cooling USA: Steam water cooler (centrifugal) (2003) 1.8 proportion (0-1) Spanswick (2003) lists the Integrated Part-Load Value (IPLV) for a steam centrifugal water cooler as 1.8 on a coefficient of performance (COP) basis. The COP is the ratio of heat removed by air conditioning to the energy applied to the air conditioner. IPLV adjusts the value for a hypothetical season according to Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute Standards 560-2000 and 550/590-1998. In other words, 1.8x more heat is removed than energy applied in steam, equivalent to an efficiency of 180%. (Note that the efficiency of steam production is handled elsewhere.)
* Wind U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.
* Wood and other biomass U.S. Department of Energy 2012 - 2011 Buildings Energy Data Book US: Buildings (2010) 0 % (0 - 100) This references shows that only electricity and natural gas are used for space cooling so efficiency of this fuel type for cooling is not applicable.

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